Necessary info for the new nanny/sitter!

Happy Thursday everybody 🙂 I have been lucky to work with some of my families for over six years now. While that has been so great some of them are starting to outgrow needing a nanny or babysitter, so recently I’ve started taking on some new families. I got names of families through a friend and have worked with three new families for a month now! It has been really fun, and such great experience having some babies again.

Since I’ve been with my families for so long now whenever I see them it’s like seeing family. It is so comfortable and easy. To say I was a little nervous to start all over again with new families was a given. I’ve been lucky to have enough work with my network of families for the last few years. BUT I wanted to form new relationships with some sweet new little kiddos. The families I’ve been working with have been so great! The kids are amazing and so fun, and the parents have been really nice and easy to get along with, which is something so important to me.

However the first day I nanny for the first family I got there, exchanged phone numbers, they gave me the daily run down, and then they were off! Thank goodness for modern technology and cellphones because I had a lot of little questions I forgot to ask in the morning rush. So that inspired me to come up with a little checklist or information to get from families the first time you watch their kids! I even created a printable, Notes for the Nanny, you can bring with as well 🙂

  1. Exchange phone numbers (including work numbers). This seems like a dumb one, I know, but sometimes you may forget to think that their office phone would come in handy. Say there’s an emergency and they aren’t answering their cell phones? It’s a long shot, and hopefully never needed, but good to have in case.
  2. ALLERGIES! I am so bad at remembering this one because I have no allergies and neither have any of the kiddos from my families I work with. BUT this is so important in case one of the kiddos does. Make sure you ask what exactly they are allergic to and what meds to give them in case they come in contact with it.
  3. Ask about screen time. This one can be so different from family to family so it’s always good to ask. Some don’t care and others limit it to a show a day. Whether you believe one way or the other always go with the parents rule. It’s not fair to the child or the parents if you change it up on the days you’re there.
  4. Ask about their favorite foods. This way you will have a good idea of what to make them for lunch or dinner without having to try and figure that out from the little one or guessing. Also ask if there is anything they really don’t like. That can help too when it comes to meal prep
  5. Ask about snacks. A hard moment for me is when the parents leave and then an hour later the kids ask for a snack and I don’t know if the parents let them have them whenever. Just ask right away. Ask what they usually have for snack and the timing. Most people have a snack shelf or drawer 🙂
  6. Wifi password 🙂 while this is more for the sake of the nanny during nap time, it can also come in handy in case any device in the house falls out of sync during the day! No one wants a sad toddler just because you told them they could watch Micky on the iPad and the signal is signed out.
  7. Random things it helps to know! Garage code (in case you leave), where the stroller is (in case you want to head outside), favorite activities (if you are searching for ideas), where the craft supplies is, nap time routine (if they need their nook or lovey), and any other little thing that puts your mind at ease!

Never be afraid of asking too many questions. Better safe than sorry is my belief. It also makes you look prepared and serious about your job. If you feel comfortable and prepared for your day ahead with the kiddos it will make you less stressed and keep them calm. Attached to this blog post is my link to Notes for the Nanny, which is a printable I created to easily get all the main information I need in case of emergency and for the day ahead! Enjoy 🙂

xoxo Kelly

© The Nanny Guide 2017

 

Goodbyes are not the end

Hello and happy Tuesday to all the lovely mommies, nannies, and caregivers out there! The Nanny Guide has been on a bit of a hiatus… Crazy end of spring and summer! Loss, love, and laughter all included in 5 months. BUT now I am back and plan to be much more consistent as the fall air and routine sets back in!

With the new school year beginning my little Ruby is off to PreK, and I’m back full time at school and working as a teacher in a local daycare for a little different experience. As sad as I am to be closing my chapter as Ruby’s nanny, I know she will always have a place in my life and I will always have a place in hers. As my old friend Dr. Seuss once said “don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.” #rubyworld This is one thing that is very important to me when it comes to leaving a nanny family.

If possible maintain contact with the family and their little ones. If you have worked with them for a year or more, you have become part of their family or at least an integral part of the children’s lives. If you just disappear and never come back that can be very hard on a little one and can leave them feeling hurt and sad. Now I know this isn’t possible in every circumstance (they/you move, bad experience with family), I think it is important to try to make time for them if you can. That said here are some of my favorite ways to spend some special times with all my past nanny kiddos.

  • Have a nanny date night! Take them out to dinner somewhere fun and catch up with them. Ask them about school or sports or life in general. The best part is this doesn’t have to be some fancy, exciting restaurant. Most kids grin ear to ear if you mention going to McDonalds! Another date night idea is to take them to a fun movie in theaters. This was always a hit with my older nanny babies. We have even found an inexpensive local movie theater where tickets are just $2.50.
  • Give them a framed picture of the two of you. I love doing this for my kiddos, young img_5408and old. If you have a fun, cute picture you love of the two of you (or all of you if you have multiples) frame it and give it to them. You can pick up a nice, inexpensive frame at Target or Michael’s Craft store. If you have a printer and a good deal on ink, I suggest printing at home because you are just printing one picture. However, if you don’t have access to a printer at home check out your local Walgreens to see what there deals on photos are right now. Usually you can find a good coupon on there for 40% off 4 by 6 prints or prints for 10 cents, etc. Then send in your order and you can most likely pick it up that day. Walgreens has a super easy to use app that makes this process even simpler.
  • Plan something special for the 2 of you around their birthday. Instead of just getting them a present or card, I like to plan a special outing for the 2 of us so we can spend some quality time together. I try to think of fun special things that parents wouldn’t easily be able to do with their kids. One time I took an old nanny baby to get a pedicure and she about died! She felt so grown up and I relished in the smiles and giggles. Other things I’ve done include taking one of the boys out to a local baseball game, and taken a girl out to tea at the American Girl Place. I’ve done the American Girl Place multiple times now with different kids and it’s always a MAJOR hit! I highly suggest this if you live near one.
  • Send them mail! Most little kids rarely get mail and if they do it is the greatest thing ever. Clarification: THIS IS NOT AN EMAIL (most young kids don’t have an email anyways haha) Go the traditional route and mail them a handwritten card or letter. This small gesture is minimal in cost (think paper, envelope, stamp) and means a lot to the children and the parents. If the child is old enough you could even write down a few questions for them in your letter so they can write you one back! Pen pals have never been so cool 🙂
  • Ask the parents if they want to go on a date night and you can babysit! I have heard from a lot of parents that they don’t want to ask you to babysit too often because they don’t want to burn you out. While that may be the case for some, for me I would spend every weekend babysitting if I could 🙂 Shoot one of your families a text every so often asking if they want a night out any weekend in x month. All the families I’ve worked for have been more than happy to pick a night and go out and do their thing! Quality time + a little bit of cash never hurt anybody.

Finding time for old families is something that is so important to me. Each and everyone of the kids I’ve watched has left a special mark on me and I hope I have left one on them. Maintaining our connections and bonds are natural and necessary for me. I have been so lucky to have great relationships with all the families I’ve worked with, I hope you all are just as lucky!

xoxo

Kelly

PS: Here are some of my favorite memories with all my babies who I don’t see every day now 🙂

How to have the best nanny/boss relationship possible!

Hi all happy Wednesday! This post is going to go a little differently than my other ones. It is designed to help BOTH nannies and parents/bosses figure out a way to have a good, healthy relationship. So please share this with any nannies you know or parents you know that have nannies!

I’ve seen a lot of posts on nanny forums recently about nannies having bad relationships with their bosses, nannies feeling used, or nannies feeling that their time is not valued. Given that I thought it might be a good time to send out some advice on how to prevent or make those things better. The key is COMMUNICATION. That is the basis for every good, healthy relationship and especially a relationship between a nanny and parent.

I have always been very communicative with my bosses. I think it helps make the job easier for me, and it helps reassure the parents that I know what I am doing and am confident. After reflecting on what I think has been the most helpful aspects of communication in my relationships with my bosses I came up with this list to share with you all! Nannies, I hope some of these ideas help you, or encourage you to have this conversation about good communication with your boss. Also, parents/bosses remember that healthy communication between a boss and their nanny is a two way street. Make sure you are open to communication and feedback from your nanny. Now let’s get at the little details!

Honesty is key from the get go. No relationship between a nanny and parent will work without honesty from both parties.

  • Nannies: Start being honest from your first meeting. Be honest about what you are willing and not willing to do as a nanny. If you feel strongly against doing maid type work, tell you boss that from day one. I know it may be a deal breaker for a job, but if you lie and say you are okay with doing the laundry and dishes, when you aren’t, down the line this could cause problems. Be honest about your schedule and flexibility. If you need to be done everyday at exactly what time the parents say they will be home, tell them that. Explain to them that you have to get your kids from school at 5:30 so you need to leave at 5, or that you have night class at 7, so you need to leave in time for that everyday. They should respect those commitments. Also be honest with them when it has been a crappy day at work. It may not feel good to tell them how rude or disrespectful their child was to you that day, but they should, and probably, want to hear that so they can talk to their child about that. I had a difficult child one summer and I had to tell the mom I couldn’t work for them any longer if he continued to treat me the way he did. It was one of the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do, but that honesty with her prompted her to have a discussion with her child about respect. It ended up not working out in the end, but what I learned from that is even when it’s hard to be honest with the parents that is when you really need to be.
  • Parents: Start by being honest from your first discussion with the potential nanny. I know you may need someone right away so the tendency is to make you sound as likable as ever, but make sure everything is honest. If you know you need a nanny who is flexible because your job is demanding then say that. Do not mislead your potential nanny, because that will cause issues down the line. When it comes to your interview ask them everything you want that you think will help you make your decision. Also answer all of your potential nanny’s questions honestly. If she asks you if she will be expected to clean up the house, answer with exactly what you want her to do and see what she says. Make sure you tell your potential nanny everything you are going to expect of them from the start, and if you see yourself adding expectations in after you see how everything goes.

Contracts may help facilitate a way of communication. 

  • This is an especially important thing for full time nanny positions. I am not an expert on nanny contracts and am not going to act like I am one 🙂 This is a good article to take a look at when preparing your contract. It gives 20 helpful ideas of what the contract should cover. The one thing I do know though is to physically print the contract out and keep it with you. The nanny and the parent should both have a physical copy to able to refer to. And DO refer to it. If part of your contract is being broken by either party, bring that up to them along with showing them the contract again. This may seem super formal, but it is an effective way for both parties to feel protected and in control.

Have an open dialogue. 

  • Make sure you both feel comfortable talking to the other if things come up. Life is messy. Things happen out of our control, and that is okay. Nannies, if you need to take some time off because of personal reasons be upfront with your boss. Explain as much as you feel you need to them, and also be open to there response. Compromise is key here. If you are requesting something outside of the realm of the contract you have to be willing to compromise. The same goes for parent/bosses, compromising sometimes is necessary. If you need to cut their hours for a few weeks for whatever reason, tell them right away. Hear what they think about that and go from there.

Some small things that may help make communication easier for all… 

  • Monthly Meetings 
    • These can be to asses how things are going for both parties. Nannies you can say what is working well and what isn’t, and parents you can do the same.
    • As you get more comfortable with each other and gain more of routine maybe make them bimonthly or every 6 months.
  • Don’t Let Little Annoyances Pile Up
    • This is true for both nannies and parents. If something is bothering you about some aspect tell the other person before it becomes something bigger than it needs to.
  • Nanny Notes!
    • I know there are a lot of templates for these out there but I created a new one for all of you. I tried to make it user friendly and printer ink friendly (ink can add up in cost big time!)
    • Nannies try filling these out each day to keep the parent informed. I have found that parents love them.
    • Parents offer to print them out for the nanny (help them save money) and then you can stay in the loop.
    • Nanny note link!

My last piece of advice: If all else fails and there is no way to achieve good communication with your nanny or your boss, quit. It sounds harsh, but don’t stay in an environment that isn’t good for you. It will only get worse for you and they family you are with.

xoxo Kelly

© The Nanny Guide, 2015